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sunshinejenn03

sunshinejenn03

Ultraviolet

Ultraviolet - R.J. Anderson I will start of by saying that UTRAVIOLET is nothing like the synopsis. If you're going into this book expecting a typical Young Adult book, then this is not for you. 1) It's Science-Fiction and 2) It's way out there.UTRAVIOLET starts out after an incident where a girl disintegrates, into thin air, and Alison, the protagonist in the novel, wakes up in the mental ward of the local hospital, foggy from drugs the doctors have given her. She has no idea where she is or why she is there. Her memory eludes her. She's transported to a nearby mental institution, where she's initially deemed a danger to herself and others.While there, she meets other patients, all with various disorders and/or neuroses, but remains positive she is sane and shouldn't be there. Those characters seemed very two dimensional, but it's possible that, with Alison's synesthesia, they were meant to be written that way, to provide a contrast between how she sees, hears and tastes (yes, tastes) the world.The concept of UTRAVIOLET is fantastic, but I think it could have been executed a little better. The first two parts of the book focuses on her time in the institution, her experiences with others and her diagnoses. While the sensory descriptions were absolutely wonderful (eg - tasting sounds, hearing stars sing, tasting and seeing colors with numbers and letters), it really doesn't start to get interesting until she meets a research scientist who is interested in her condition. There is plenty of focus on that, and then wham! You're left with a staggering plot twist right out of left field in the third portion of the book... that doesn't flow well with the rest of the book and seems a bit rushed. Overall, it was an enjoyable read and I do recommend it to those who like Science-Fiction and Young Adult. It will definitely surprise you.